Jade Oakley

Jade Oakley

 

Jade Oakley has been developing her craft for the past 25 years, mastering the mechanics and compositional perfection of Alexander Calder, the great 20th century artist and inventor of the mobile. The kinetic artworks she builds are infinitely flexible - adapting materials and their strength to the scale of the pieces and the size of the elements.

Oakley’s kinetic and static artworks are adaptable to many kinds of settings, indoor and outdoor, intimate spaces and especially large atria.  She has produced significant public art commissions for clients across Australia and internationally including Crown Casino, Westfield, Lend Lease and The Royal Children’s Hospital.

Wolfgang Buttress

Wolfgang Buttress

 

Wolfgang Buttress is an award winning artist who creates simple, elegant and contextual public artworks which seek to define and celebrate a sense of place. Through the use of materials, repetition of natural form and sensitive reference to history and location, each piece enriches its location in a holistic and sustainable manner.

Buttress explores and interprets scientific discoveries, collaborating with architects, landscape architects, scientists and musicians to create human-centred experiences.  He is well known for the UK Pavilion (Milan EXPO 2015) and The Hive, which is currently installed at Royal Botanic Gardens in London. The project has won over 25 awards including the gold medal for best in show at the 2015 Expo in Milan.

Daniel Templeman

Daniel Templeman

 

Daniel Templeman completed a Doctorate in Visual Arts in 2013. He has exhibited nationally and internationally and completed major public artworks for the Brisbane Magistrates Court, The Queensland/New South Wales border, 31 Queen Street Melbourne CBD, University of Western Sydney, Brisbane’s Southbank Educational Precinct, the entrance to North Sydney CBD and Gold Coast University Hospital.

His art practice explores notions of both, perception and connection. Perception, by engaging the viewer in a conceptual conflict through form, for example, what appears solid is hollow, what appears fluid is fixed, and; connection by creating objects that are contingent on anterior phenomenon such as light, movement, gravity, the site and the body.

Geoffrey Bartlett

Geoffrey Bartlett

 

Geoffrey Bartlett is regarded as one of Australia’s most important sculptors. He is widely known for both his studio-based sculptures and major public and corporate commissions, working predominately within the language of abstraction.

Bartlett has undertaken public sculpture commissions for the National Gallery of Victoria, the City of Auckland, the City of Melbourne, the City of Newcastle, the Australian National University and Melbourne Docklands. He is represented in the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Parliament House Art Collection, Heide Museum of Modern Art and in many regional, university, corporate and private collections.

Locust Jones

Locust Jones

 

Locust Jones has a Bachelor and Master of Visual Arts from Sydney College of the Arts and has exhibited extensively in Australia, New Zealand and internationally for the past decade.  He has undertaken artist-in-residence programs in Beirut; Seoul, as an Asialink award recipient; and Hill End.

“There is a consistency to the work of Locust Jones that has a distinctly modernist ring to it. He's an artist who operates around the idea of a signature style. Take for instance his chosen mode of image making, the drawn line. The lines that have been extending themselves out across the surface of his drawings for many years now have remained stubbornly clumsy. Even after all this time they retain a signature rawness. As someone who's long admired his work I've often wondered at this; been curious about the pains he's taken to preserve this rudimentary look. It's as if one part of his identity as an artist has been forged by the scrupulous suppression of technical virtuosity; a deliberate blocking off of the skills that surreptitiously attach themselves to actions we perform on a daily basis. Because Locust is someone who has been making lines on an almost daily basis for many years.” Justine Trendall

Nike Savvas

Nike Savvas

 

Nike Savvas is a leading contemporary artist who employs a dazzling palette and repeated geometric forms in her practice.  Trained as a painter, she also works fluidly across sculpture, installation, kinetic and light-based media. From singular objects to vast, cascading installations, her art is as visually compelling as it is conceptually grounded.

Savvas’ work often consists of large-scale installations that ‘translate’ painting into three dimensions and popular culture into high art. Blurring the boundaries between disciplines, genres and materials, her unique iconography produces an experiential zone of physical and sensory immersion.

Beat Zoderer

Beat Zoderer

 

Beat Zoderer predominantly uses everyday materials as a basis for his work. The artist sources his materials from general hardware stores. Rather than altering them, Zoderer makes use of these materials within what at first appears to be methodical structures based on repetition or mathematical systems.

During the largely spontaneous process of creating works, Zoderer is guided by an attempt to create order in chaos. To facilitate this he sometimes draws on the formal language of historic works of geometric abstraction. The complexity of each piece consciously allows for imperfections and mistakes. It is this self-contradicting and ambiguous quality of the works that gives them the playfulness that probably best characterizes the artist and his work.

Marion Borgelt

Marion Borgelt

 

Marion Borgelt draws inspiration from subjects such as semiotics, language and phenomenology to create atavistic fantasies and mysteries in the forms of painting, sculpture and installation. Her work suggests connections between culture and nature, between the constructed world and the organic world, between microcosm and macrocosm and the duality of light and dark.

A lexicon of symbols and motifs, at once universal and personal, distinguishes the imagery of Borgelt’s work. Drawing on experience with a wide range of materials, including bees-wax, canvas, felt, pigment, stainless steel, wood, stone and organic matter, she hones her ideas to the demands of a given site, mediating the creative intervention with originality and sensitivity.

Janet Laurence

Janet Laurence

 

Exploring notions of art, science, imagination, memory, and loss, Janet Laurence’s practice examines the interconnection of life forms and ecologies and observes the impact that humans have on the threatened, natural world. Laurence’s work addresses our relationship to nature through both site specific and gallery works. Experimenting with and working in varying mediums, Laurence continues to create immersive environments that navigate the interconnections between all living forms. Her practice has sustained organic qualities and a sense of transience, occupying the liminal zones, or places where art, science, imagination and memory converge.

Major commissioned works include: The Australian War Memorial (in collaboration with TZG Architects), Hyde Park, London; Tarkine for a World in Need of Wilderness Macquarie Bank London, In the Shadow, Sydney 2000 Olympic Park; Waterveil, CH2 Building for Melbourne City Council, Elixir, Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennial, Japan; and Memory of Lived Spaces, T3 Terminal Changi Singapore.

Sandra Pitkin

Sandra Pitkin

 

Sandra’s work is inspired by her interest in nature, science and the reciprocal connections between humanity and the living world. This focus also encompasses the environment we create at a personal level and the effect time imparts on the whole.  Her interest in experience and concern with environment reflects in her desire to create site specific work; the intention being the work should belong to the space it inhabits.

Pitkin often uses the forms of nature to spark recognition and reflection in the viewer, and of how we live among the world. Whilst often working with copper and paper, Sandra continues to explore other media and methods of creation.  Since graduating BVA (hons.) at Sydney College of the Arts, Pitkin has exhibited her work in many outdoor exhibitions and galleries. She has fulfilled numerous commissions, won several awards and her works are represented in private collections.

Christina Waterson

Christina Waterson

 

Christina Waterson is an artist, designer and maker that employs a rich palette of materials to realize intricate three-dimensional surfaces and forms that extend our spatial perception and enrich public spaces. Waterson finds beauty in repetition. Her weavings, foldings and curving arabesques transport the viewer deep into the spatial and rhythmic qualities of her work; an aesthetic state of bliss that involves being lost in their delicate complexity.

Waterson’s public artworks are site-specific and respond to the scale and natural history of their locale. The materiality and form of Waterson’s surfaces subtly reflect changes in light and shadow, and beautifully frame their surrounding environment.

Peter D. Cole

Peter D. Cole

 

Peter D. Cole studied Sculpture at the South Australian School of Art where he was awarded the H.P. Gill Medal in 1968. Since the 1970’s Cole has es­tablished himself as one of Australia’s most renowned contemporary sculptors. He has largely lived and worked in rural areas of Australia, drawing on the landscape as a source of inspiration and research trips to Japan and India have added to his rich source material.

As public artist, Cole has made a significant contribution to the urban landscape and has received awards including the Australian National Trust Heritage Award and the Australian Institute of Landscape Architecture Award of Merit for Foundation Park, a permanent work at The Rocks, Sydney. His work is prominent in many public and corporate collections, including Parliament House, the National Gallery of Australia, and Brisbane International Airport.

Sonia Van De Haar | Lymesmith

Sonia Van De Haar | Lymesmith

 

Sonia van de Haar first studied Painting at the Canberra Institute of the Arts, ANU, and Architecture at the University of NSW. She works under the title, Lymesmith, working between colour, architecture and art, creating inventive and architectural sensitive colour concepts and painted interventions for buildings, infrastructure, walls, street scapes, public places, landscapes and interiors.

A recent large scale artwork The Runnel, is a 150metre long road painting for ELYSIUM in Byron Bay. Through incorporating site specific material palettes, her ambition was to express and enhance onlookers understanding of the laneway.

Andrew Dennis

Andrew Dennis

 

Andrew Dennis is an artist living and working in Sydney.  Studio Dennis is the collective name for a practice which covers multiple outputs such as mural art, painting, design, textiles and street graphics. Drawing from a diverse range of influences including 20th century art, low-brow comics, skateboard culture and points in-between, he has developed a unique language that is complex and unique.

One of Sydney’s most prolific street artists, Dennis’ graphic, brightly coloured and geometrically patterned artworks conjure up curious scenes from abstract dreamscapes and kaleidoscopic natural environments. Working with a collection of characters and objects best described as a cabinet of curiosities, Dennis creates a decorative wallpaper that deals in subjects such as civilisation, future living, bio domes and animal behaviour.

Marguerite Derricourt

Marguerite Derricourt

 

Marguerite Derricourt’s sculpture traverses numerous disciplines and materials. As a visual artist, Derricourt draws her inspiration from nature. Her conceptual interests lie in expressing personal concerns of natural world; specifically focusing on life cycles of moths and butterflies, animals, birds and trees. While developing ideas, Derricourt experiments in a variety of materials such as steel, wire, cast bronze, clay, mixed media and cast paper.